The happenings "inside" the Wisconsin State Treasury and across the street at the State Capitol

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Treasurer’s Top 5: Racine County


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This week, we travel to Racine County.  Here’s a look at the Top 5 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you see anyone on this list you know?  If so, have check out  www.wismissingmoney.com and search their name to make a claim.  They can also call 855-375-CASH (2274)

Racine County

Murad Gengozian

Gail M Lloyd

Lance Clausen

Nancy Madsen

Ganton Technologies Incorporated

Money Matters: Employer Provided Benefits


Employer Provided Benefits

Employee Benefits

As we honor those who work hard on this Labor Day, we feel it’s an appropriate time to remind to make sure you’re maximizing your employee benefits.  Our friends at www.practicalmoneyskills.com tell you how!

Most employers offer a host of company-sponsored benefits. Often, the combined value of these coverages is worth a third or more of your base pay. That’s too much money to leave on the table. And some employee benefits have valuable tax advantages you can’t afford to ignore.

If your employer provides a 401(k) plan or Health Care and Dependent Care Flexible Spending Accounts (FSAs) and you’re not participating, you could be missing out on hundreds – or thousands – of dollars in tax savings each year. That’s money that goes right into your pocket instead of Uncle Sam’s.

Here you’ll find the ins and outs of employee benefits and everything you need to maximize your job and all it has to offer.

Labor Day 2014: A Message From Treasurer Schuller


Many view Labor Day weekend as another long weekend for grilling out, boating and certainly preparing for Back-to-School.  But at the Wisconsin Office of the State Treasurer, we want you to understand it means a great deal more to us.  We honor all the hard working people here in Wisconsin every day, but certainly on this day of national tribute to Wisconsin workers….. American workers.

Below, I leave you with some great information from the U.S. Department of Labor Day.  I wish you a safe Labor Day weekend and of course thank you for your hard work each and every day.

Sincerely,

State Treasurer 42

 

 

 

 

 

Kurt Schuller, Wisconsin State Treasurer

 

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Labor Day: What it Means

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Founder of Labor Day

The father of labor day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

A Nationwide Holiday

Women's Auxiliary Typographical Union

The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

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FAQ Unclaimed Property : Where Do I Call With Questions?


Some of the Numbers have changed as the Unclaimed Property Program is now being adminstered by the Department of Revenue.  The Office of the State Treasurer is still responsible for promoting the program and is happy to answer any questions we can for you.  However, at the request of the Department of Revenue, direct lines to claims processors were removed from our website and they asks you to call and general line.  That number is: 

(608) 264-4594

 

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FAQ Edvest: What Are the Tax Advantages?


edvest

What are the federal and state tax advantages?

When you contribute to the Edvest College Savings Plan, any account earnings can grow federal and Wisconsin income tax free. Plus, withdrawals used to pay for qualified higher education expenses will be free from federal and Wisconsin income tax. Non-qualified withdrawals may be subject to federal and state taxes and the additional federal 10% tax.

Wisconsin Saves Fun Tip: Prepare For Back To School, Track Your Sales Week 4


OST Design large sealThe Wisconsin Office of the State Treasurer proudly teams up with WWBIC (Wisconsin’s WomensWWBIC Business Initiative Corporation) for “Wisconsin Saves Fun Tip.”

The entire month of August, we are committed to helping you PREPARE FOR BACK TO SCHOOL AND SAVE!

This week, it’s all about Tracking Your Sales to find the best deals : 

  • Track your sales.  Retailers use sales to lure you in so start tracking weekly sales flyers now and don’t make all of your purchases at one place.  If there is an item on sale at a different store, bring the sales flyer with you – most larger retailers will price match.  And don’t forget to keep an eye on sales for office supply stores!

Treasurer’s Top 5: Racine County


 

 

This week, we travel to Racine County.  Here’s a look at the Top 5 people and businesses there with unclaimed assets. Do you see anyone on this list you know?  If so, have check out  www.wismissingmoney.com and search their name to make a claim.  They can also call 855-375-CASH (2274)

Racine County

Murad Gengozian

Gail M Lloyd

Lance Clausen

Nancy Madsen

Ganton Technologies Incorporated

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